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Nunavik first to carry Arctic cargo through the Northwest Passage

Le Nunavik, premier navire à transporter une cargaison arctique par le Passage du Nord-Ouest

2014-09-20

The Nunavik, Fednav's most modern icebreaking ship is one of the first commercial vessels to transit the Northwest Passage completely and the first to do so unescorted with an Arctic cargo. The 31,700-DWT bulk carrier sailed September 19, 2014 from Deception Bay in Northern Quebec carrying a cargo of nickel concentrate bound for the port of Bayuquan, Liaoning Province, China.

By favouring the Northwest Passage over the regular Panama Canal route, the Nunavik will save roughly 5,000 nautical miles (9,400 km) or 20 days of sailing and therefore more than 1,300 tonnes of greenhouse gas emissions.

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Second vessel added to Cleveland-Europe Express

2014-09-18

The Port of Cleveland and Amsterdam-based Spliethoff Group have announced their mutual intent to add a second monthly vessel to the Cleveland-Europe Express (CEE), the only scheduled ocean service for containerized and breakbulk freight operating between Europe and a Great Lakes port.

"We are extremely pleased to announce our intent to add a second sailing to the CEE starting next season or perhaps sooner to better accommodate the needs of the containerized segment of the market, which requires more frequent sailings," said Will Friedman, CEO of the Port of Cleveland, on September 18.  With two ships, the CEE will offer regularly scheduled departures every two weeks from both Antwerp and Cleveland.

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CSL announces top                    corporate changes

2014-09-15

CSL President and CEO, Rod Jones has announced two appointments that will serve to strengthen CSL's core competencies and position the company for the future.

Effective January 1, 2015, Louis Martel, currently President of Canada Steamship Lines, will assume the position of President, CSL International.

In this role, Mr. Martel will be responsible for the leadership of CSL's international divisions, namely CSL Americas, CSL Europe, CSL Asia, CSL Australia and CSL Transhipment. He will continue to be based in Montreal.

Mr. Martel will also retain his Group-wide responsibilities as head of the following programs: Safety and SafePartners, Environmental Technologies and Innovation, Sustainability and Regulatory Compliance, Global Ship Management, and Global Technical Services.

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Canadian shipping interests voice concern over CETA impact

2014-09-11

The members of the Canadian Shipowners Association (CSA) are concerned that the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) with the European Union may hurt Canada's short sea shipping industry, its workers and suppliers and shippers.

Similar concerns have been expressed by the St. Lawrence Shipoperators and the Seafarers' International Union of Canada.

Martin Fournier, Executive Director of the St. Lawrence Shipoperators, deplored "an unfair lack of reciprocity"  in an agreement which reportedly opens the Canadian market to Europeans but does not accord the same access to Canadian shipping interests on European markets.

"While the CETA deal is good for the Canadian economy," said CSA President Robert Lewis-Manning (our photo), "it cannot be allowed to jeopardize the Canadian short sea shipping capacity that the domestic marine industry, labour and the government have collectively developed  to meet Canada's unique domestic shipping challenges."

Canadian domestic ship owners have, in the past few years,  invested in 14 state of the art high-efficiency vessels worth over $700 million, which are positioned to play a part in the prosperity that CETA will bring, the CSA said.

Recent government support through the removal of the twenty-five per cent import duty on foreign-built vessels facilitated CSA member purchase of these vessels with leading edge environmental technologies and safety features.

The CSA is concerned about the lack of transparency in the CETA negotiations and the fact that access to trades between Canadian ports may be given to EU carriers who employ international labour at much lower rates, do not pay Canadian taxes or employ Canadian workers and are not regulated to rigorous Transport Canada safety and operating standards for Canadian flag vessels.

 
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